Why pray the Rosary every day for a year?


Each time the Blessed Virgin has appeared-- whether it be to Saint Bernadette Soubirous at Lourdes; to Lucia, Jacinta, and Francisco at Fatima; or to Mariette Beco at Banneux-- she has asserted the importance, saving grace, and power of praying the Holy Rosary on a daily basis. Based upon her words, the Rosary is penance and conversion for sinners, a pathway to peace, an end to war, and a powerful act of faith in Jesus Christ. Pope Paul VI presented the Rosary as a powerful means to reach Christ "not merely with Mary but indeed, insofar as this is possible to us, in the same way as Mary, who is certainly the one who thought about Him more than anyone else has ever done."

To show us how this is done, perhaps no one has been more eloquent than the great Cardinal Newman, who wrote: "The great power of the Rosary consists in the fact that it translates the Creed into Prayer. Of course, the Creed is already in a certain sense a prayer and a great act of homage towards God, but the Rosary brings us to meditate again on the great truth of His life and death, and brings this truth close to our hearts. Even Christians, although they know God, usually fear rather than love Him. The strength of the Rosary lies in the particular manner in which it considers these mysteries, since all our thinking about Christ is intertwined with the thought of His Mother, in the relations between Mother and Son; the Holy Family is presented to us, the home in which God lived His infinite love."


As Mary said at Fatima, "Jesus wants to use you to make Me known and loved. He wishes to establish the devotion to My Immaculate Heart throughout the world. I promise salvation to whoever embraces it; these souls will be dear to God, like flowers put by Me to adorn his throne."


September 2: The Martyrs of September: Carmelite Massacre of 1792

Posted by Jacob

Today, September 2 (and tomorrow, September 3), we celebrate the feast days of the September Martyrs of the French Revolution, among them John Francis Burté; Appolinaris of Posat; Severin Girault; John Baptist Triquerie; Blessed Alexander Lenfant; Blessed John du Lau (Bishop of Arles); Francis de la Rochefoucauld,(Bishop of Beauvais); Louis de la Rochefoucauld (Bishop of Saintes); Benedictine Augustine Chevreux (last su­perior general of the Maurists); Charles de la Calmette, the count of Valfons; Julian Massey; Louis de la Touche; Carmes; and hundreds of others. By the conclusion of the French Revolution, over 1500 priests and religious had been martyred for their refusal to renounce the faith. Today, we remember their courage, steadfastness, and commitment to the true Word of God.

The martyrdom of the “September Martyrs” spans several years, but are celebrated on the same two days each September. While their glorious deaths did not occur simultaneously, each of the martyred religious died for the same reason—defending the faith. At that time, the Civil Constitution of the Clergy (1791) required all priests and religious to take an oath to the French government, placing them under the control of the government, and amounting to a denial of the faith. Each of these brave men and women refused and was subsequently executed.

From the Acts of Martyrdom: “The upheaval which occurred in France toward the close of the 18th century wrought havoc in all things sacred and profane and vented its fury against the Church and her ministers. Unscrupulous men came to power who concealed their hatred for the Church under the deceptive guise of philosophy.... It seemed that the times of the early persecutions had returned. The Church, spotless bride of Christ, became resplendent with bright new crowns of martyrdom.”

What is known in history as the Carmelite Massacre of 1792, added nearly 200 victims to this noble company of martyrs. After refusing to take the oath in support of the civil constitution, these priests and religious brothers and sisters were imprisoned in a Carmelite convent and then massacred in the space of two days by bloodthirsty revolutionary mobs. Among these priests were a Conventual, a Capuchin, and a member of the Third Order Regular.

John Francis Burte was born in the town of Rambervillers in Lorraine. At the age of 16 he joined the Franciscans at Nancy and there he also pronounced his solemn vows. In due time he was ordained a priest and for some time taught theology to the younger members of the order. Father John Francis was placed in charge of the large convent in Paris and encouraged his brethren to practice strict observance of the rule. His zeal for souls was outstanding, and he zealously guarded the rights of the Church in this troubled period of history. When the French Revolution broke out, he was reported for permitting his priests to exercise their functions after they refused to take the infamous oath required by the government, and which was a virtual denial of their Faith. He was arrested and held captive with other priests in the convent of the Carmelites.

Apollinaris of Posat, of Swiss descent was educated by the Jesuits. In 1762 he joined the Capuchins became a prominent preacher, a much-sought confessor, and an eminent instructor of the young clerics of the order. He impressed on their minds the truth that piety and learning are the two eyes of a priest, and humility was a dominating virtue in his life. On route to the far East as a missionary, he was imprisoned along with the Carmelites for refusal to take the oath.

Severin Girualt, a priest of the Third Order Regular born at Rouen in Normandy, and early in life joined the Third Order Regular of Saint. Francis. Because of his eminent mental gifts he was chosen a superior of his order. In the exercise of his priestly duties he displayed marked zeal for souls, and as chaplain of the convent of Saint Elizabeth in Paris he was a prudent director in the ways of religious perfection. Seized and detained with the others in the Carmelite convent, he became the first victim of the massacre while praying the Daily Office in the convent garden.

Blessed John du Lau was the archbishop of Arles, France. Arrested with the others, and confined to the Carmelite convent, he was praying when 150 armed men stormed the sanctuary. The “prisoners” were ordered into the garden. When they heard that the Blessed John was praying in the chapel, they called for him. When summoned, he came out and he said, “I am he whom you seek.” Thereupon, they cracked his skull, stabbed him and trampled him underfoot.

Having set an example of the blessed Archbishop, the leader set up a “tribunal” before which the imprisoned were herded and ordered to take the oath. All refused, and one by one, as they passed down the stairway, they were hacked to pieces by the murderers.

It is hard to imagine these types of massacres—the fear and horror the priests and religious must have experienced watching their fellow servants of God cut down for the faith. And yet, despite the fear, none among the nearly 200 imprisoned renounced their faith or took the oath. The steadfast courage and fortitude of these holy men and women remind us today that even in the midst of opposition and negative public opinion, our Catholic faith is strong—and the strength of our faith community comes from our own personal relationships with the Lord. He lifts us up. He gives us strength. He surrounds us with His gracious love. If God is for us, who can be against us?


God our Father,
through the prayers of our Martyrs
who bore faithful witness to the end of their lives,
inspire us to give of ourselves in joyful sacrifice.


Empower us with your Spirit
that we may grow in wisdom and integrity of character
and develop a true sense of values
through following Christ our Lord. Amen.


Year 2: Day 245 of 365
Prayer Intentions: Strength and conviction
Requested Intentions: Mother’s health (A); Financial security, freedom from anxiety (S); For a son and cousins (L); Peace and civility (B); Successful examination results (D); Safety of family, strength, courage, wisdom (C); For the souls of a departed father and brother, finding of a suitable marriage partner (R); Successful pilgrimage, deepening of prayer life (R); Restoration of health (J); Restoration of health (S); Freedom from pride (A); For children and marriage (M); For the birth of a healthy baby (Y); For personal family intentions, for the sick, poor, hungry, and homeless (G); Financial security and peace (J); Grace, peace, and obedience to the will of God in a marriage (H); Successful and blessed marriage for sin, freedom from anxiety for husband, spiritual contentedness for family (N); Employment and health for a husband (B); Recovery and health of a mother (J); For a family to grow closer to the Church, salvation for all children (D); Successful employment (L); Successful employment (S); Renewal of faith life (A); Support for an intended marriage, health for friend and aunt (J); Mental health assistance for son (G); Freedom from illness (S); Successful employment (C); Financial assistance and employment (B); For a family’s intentions (T); Successful examination results (B); Healing of a friend with cancer, for all those who help others (B); Healing and love (L); Grace and healing (V); Healing of a heart, consecration of a marriage (M); Health of a family, intentions of apostolate (H); For repentance (J); For a family in trouble (R).

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